Improving Enemies with Particle Effects

Yet again I am back on Project 1, making improvements. This time I decided to add some more visual features to the enemies. I wanted to make the enemies stand out because they can be hard to see, since both the enemies and the background have similar cream colours. Also, since the enemy sprites just disappear when they have lost all their health, I wanted to have a fade or a transition just so it looks better.

What I added is a particle effect that sits behind an enemy and fades after the enemy dies. The effect is intended to make the enemy appear as if they have an aura.

To do this I created a Particle System in Unity, set its Shape to Mesh and its Mesh to Cylinder.

ShapeMesh.png

The reason I selected Mesh > Cylinder instead of Circle is because particles spawn in the centre and around the edge of the Cylinder, whereas Circle has particles spawning inside the Circle. You can see the difference below.

ShapeCompare.png

ShapeCompareSettings.png

The Particle System on the left is the Cylinder and the Particle System on the right is the Circle. Both have the same settings, which you can see in the image above.

The Cylinder Shape suits my needs more because, when speed is set to a negative, all the particles centre in a single spot. This gives me the kind of fading effect that I am looking for. Below is an image of the Cylinder Particle System with Start Speed set to -0.5 and Emission > Rate Over Time set to 500.

Cylinder.png

For the actual Particle System I used the following settings and got the following result:

CylinderSettings.png

CylinderDone.png

Now to put the Particle System underneath an enemy sprite.

CylinderSprite.png

In order to make the Particle System linger and fade after the the Enemy sprite has been destroy, we need to write some code. We can’t make the Particle System a child of the the Enemy sprite because when the Enemy sprite is destroyed the Particle System will be destroyed as well.

The first that we have to do is reference the Particle System.StopLoopCodeStart.png

Also, set up a bool that we will use later.

StopLoopCodeBool.png

Then, in the function that controls when the enemy is destroyed, line 41 of the code below retrieves the Main section of our Particle System and line 42 retrieves the Loop setting of our Particle System and changes its value to the bool made earlier.

StopLoopCode.png

Be sure to put the code above the Destroy code, otherwise the Enemy will be destroyed and will not run anymore code.

Now we have a Particle System that fades when the Enemy sprite is destroyed, but what happens when the Enemy sprite moves? Well the Particle System, at the moment, doesn’t follow the Enemy sprite. Let’s change that.FollowCode.png

The above code has a public reference to a GameObject, meaning that we can drag and drop the specific Enemy sprite that we want to be associated with this code. Then the Follow() function finds the Enemy’s position, if available, and makes the Particle System’s position equal to it. Finally, this function is called in Update().

Now the Particle System follows the Enemy sprite and fades away shortly after the Enemy sprite is destroyed.

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